Thursday, October 14, 2010

It's not too early to get vaccinated as flu season nears

The influenza season is approaching and Racine County Health Officials are encouraging all residents 6 months and older to get vaccinated. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Southern Hemisphere’s predominant circulating influenza viruses are good matches for all three types of influenza contained in this year’s seasonal influenza vaccine. Influenza season in the United States generally occurs during the winter months but can occur as early as October or as late as April. Wisconsin has only seen sporadic cases so far this season.

Influenza vaccination is the single most important method to prevent influenza infections. The CDC now recommends that all people aged 6 months and older should receive a flu shot. Children under 6 months of age are best protected when their household members and caregivers are vaccinated against influenza. Flu shots are available from various health care providers throughout the community.

Additional methods to protect yourself and others from contracting and spreading influenza are the use of common sense measures such as good handwashing and covering your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing. People with symptoms of influenza, fever (or feeling feverish), cough, sore throat, runny nose, achiness and fatigue, should stay home from work or school during their illness.

Influenza has a significant impact on the community each year. Recently the CDC analyzed three decades of influenza seasons (1976-2007) and reported an estimate of 23,607 deaths per year from influenza infections on average. The actual number of deaths varies from season to season ranging from 3,349 to 48,614 deaths depending on the type of influenza circulating. In addition to causing death, the effects of influenza can burden the United States health care system and workforce resulting in increased medical costs, hospitalizations and lost worker productivity.

For more information on obtaining a flu shot, contact your health care provider, local health department, or visit the Wisconsin Flu Clinic Finder on the web.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Transition Racine to hear presentation

Transition Racine will meet Monday, Oct. 11, at 6:30 p.m. to hear a presentation by Tom Brandstetter on the history and progress of Transition Milwaukee, the need for everyone to power down energy use, his personal efforts to do so, and his trip to Denmark.

The meeting will be held at Gateway Technical College in the Racine Building's Superior Room on the 1st floor.

Transition Racine is part of a global-wide effort to create, enhance, promote and support local community projects and businesses. It wants to support local farmers, encourage members to grow/share their own food, learn to power down and save energy, generate our own power, support our local economies, local resilience and self-reliance.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Homeopathic treatment, flower essence sessions offered

Marybeth Buchele, a homeopathic master practitioner with a practice in Menomonie and St. Louis Park, MN, will offer three programs in Racine in October about the effectiveness of natural treatments including classical homeopathy and traditional flower essences.
Homeopathy is a science developed about 200 years ago in Europe based on the principle that  “like cures like.” In simple words, it means that any substance, which can produce symptoms in a healthy person, can cure similar symptoms in a person who is sick.  For instance, an onion which makes your eyes water and your nose burn; if you are having an attack of hay fever with watering eyes and a burning nose, a homeopathic remedy made from onion can relieve it.

The original Bach Flower Remedies is a system of 38 flower remedies that corrects emotional imbalances: negative emotions are replaced with positive. They were developed by the late Dr. Edward Bach, a British physician, who began to see disease as an end product; a final stage; a physical manifestation of unhappiness, fear and worry. He  looked to nature to find healing flowers and, during a period of years, found 38 flowers and plants that, with, preparation, became the 38 Bach Flower Remedies.

Buchele is a graduate of the Northwestern Academy of Homeopathy in Minneapolis and the Bach  Centre in England, and has been using these essences for more than 25  years.

The programs in Racine include:

Bach  Flower Essences to Ease Life’s Emotional Challenges:  In this class, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19.   Buchele will cover all 38 of the Bach essences. Cost is $30.

Healing Winter Colds and Flu the Natural Way: Sniffles, sore throats, sneezing, fever and all-over body aches aren't an unavoidable part of winter.  Buchele will discuss how homeopathy, herbs and vitamins can tune up your immune system,  from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21. A free-will offering will be requested for this presentation.

Both sessions will be held at Lake House Health and Learning Center, 932 Lake Ave. Call Lake (262) 633-2645 to reserve a space; get directions and other information.

Buchele will also serve as guest speaker at the morning monthly “Cup of Consciousness" gathering on Oct. 20 at Cup Of Hope, 507 Sixth St., to discuss “Natural Practical Ways To Improve Your Health.” In addition, she will take appointments for private consultations on Oct. 19-21, which cost $350; $100 deposit is required prior to the appointment. For reservations and further details, access her website or call (715) 231-6068.

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Medication disposal box opens at Police Department

Expired, unwanted or unused pharmaceuticals and medications my be dropped off for displosal at the Racine Police Department, starting on Saturday, Sept. 25.

Medications can be deposited anonymously in the Prescription Medication Drop Box located in
the front lobby area of the Racine Police Department at 730 Center St. beginning at 8 a.m., as the department participates in National Take Back Day, sponsored by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

Medication may remain in the original packaging and placed in the drop box. Participants may remove personal identifying information from the packing, but this is not necessary.

Medication which is unused or unwanted and remains in a home is vulnerable to misuse, abuse and diversion. Disposing of these medications by throwing them away or flushing them down the toilet can be a safety and health hazard.

National Take Back Day is a “kick off” for the Racine Police Department’s permanent drop box, a collaborative effort between the Wisconsin Alliance for Drug Endangered Children, the Racine Wastewater Utility, the Racine Health Department and the Racine Police Department. The Prescription Medication Drop Box will remain in the lobby of the Police Department and available for the public to deposit unwanted and unused medications Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Lakeview Pharmacy offers safe drug disposal program

Lakeview Pharmacy is offering a drug take back program to help patients safely dispose of medicines that may be dangerous to others and to the environment. The program came about because of news about pharmaceuticals contaminating the water supply, and teenage abuse of prescription drugs.

“As members of the community, pharmacists are in a prime position to ensure the safe and proper handling of medications, from dispensing to disposal,” said Pete Ciaramita co-owner of Lakeview Pharmacy.  “Unused or expired medications pose risks to our families, communities, and the environment." Pharmacists will talk to anyone about their prescriptions and how to store, use and dispose of them, he said.

Patients of any pharmacy are invited to safely dispose of unused and expired medications at Lakeview Pharmacy, free of charge, by bringing in the drugs in their original containers. The pharmacy will dispose of the drugs using the Sharps TakeAway Environmental Return System. Controlled substances are not accepted. 

The Office of National Drug Control has found that prescription drugs are the drug of choice among 12- and 13-year olds, while a third of all new abusers of prescription drugs were between the ages of 12 and 17. Though the amount of drugs in drinking water may be negligible, more and more consumers are disposing of unused medicines by flushing them down the drain, adding pharmaceutical pollution to our waters. Medicines thrown in the trash can end up in landfills if not first picked up by children, pets, sanitation employees, or anyone who rummages through trash.

Ciaramita is a member of the National Community Pharmacists Association which in April launched a drug disposal program to protect people and the environment. The organization represents more than 23,000 community pharmacies that dispense nearly half of the nation's retail prescription medicines.

Monday, September 20, 2010

Midwest Training Series begins its fifth year at Lake House

The new Midwest Training Series for professionals who want to learn psychodrama and experiential skills to enhance their work begins Friday, Sept. 24, with "Endings And Beginnings: Using Action For Significant Transitions," at Lake House Health and Learning Center, 932 Lake Ave.

The series, now in its fifth year, covers a range of material including sociometry and group skills, Systemic Family Constellation Work, sand tray and the Therapeutic Spiral Model as well as the historical and theoretical foundations of psychodrama.

Most classes are taught by Karen Carnabucci, right, a licensed clinical social worker certified in the new Systemic Constellation Work. Carnabucci is  working on a book titled, "Psychodrama And Systemic Constellation Work: New Directions for Action Methods, Experiential Therapy And Energy Healing" to be published in 2011.

Continuing education credits are available.

In the Sept. 24 class, from 9 a.m. to noon, Carnabucci  will teach participants how to bring action and simple rituals to working with groups and individuals who are beginning or ending relationships, jobs, careers or other kinds of transitions. Specific topics include:
  • How to evoke memories of past important events and experiences
  • Notice when you are the “bridge” of change.
  • Take appropriate action to acknowledge endings and transitions.
  • Honoring the new and the unknown.
Tuition is $35 and includes three continuing education credits and psychodrama hours for social workers, addictions counselors and licensed professional counselors. To register contact Karen Carnabucci at (262) 633-2645 to reserve your space by Thursday morning, Sept. 23.

Future classes include:
  • Oct. 22: Introducing Action In 1-1 Settings For Counselors, Coaches, Others
  • Oct. 30: Mothers, Daughters, Grandmothers and Others with Systemic Constellation Work with co-presenter Gerlinde Gelina, who has 14 years in Gestalt therapy and Constellation Work. The program will also be available on Oct. 29 if there is enough interest.
  • Nov. 5: Sand Tray Theatre: A Miniature World That Tells Big Stories
Classes in 2011 will be listed online  where interested persons may also sign up for the center's e-newsletter on current trainings and other professional resources. For more information, call (262) 633-2645 or see the current newsletter posted at the Lake House blog. 

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Just for Men Stretch offered at Your Yoga Lifestyle

September is National Yoga Month and yoga studios are providing communities with ways to promote health and awareness for healthier lifestyles. 

Your Yoga Lifestyle is offering an opportunity geared towards men, called Just for Men Stretch, on Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, at the studio, 518 College Ave., 2nd floor.

There will be no music, no dance, no chants. Rather, three different demonstrations by three different men for three different male types. What type of male are you:
  • Athletic, competitive, runner, biker, consider themselves physically fit.
  • Middle aged, possibly stressed, doesn't participate in sports like he used to, enjoys his remotes, TV, a cold brew and perhaps has a belly to go with that.
  • Senior or could act like one, knees hurt, backaches, extremely inflexible.
At the same time, Your Yoga Lifestyle is working to benefit The Make A Wish Foundation that helps children with devastating diseases.  Linda Messerschmidt, studio owner, has a nephew,  Shaymus Guinn, with cancer who recently received a travel award to Sea World through Make A Wish Foundation. In his honor, she would like others to benefit from this worthwhile charity.  A $20 donation is suggested.   RSVP at 262.880.4044 or sign up online.  All men attending this event will also receive a 20% discount off the cost of any class pass they purchase between Sept. 18 and 30.

A Free Week of Yoga is also offered during the month of September to experienced students who are new to Your Yoga Lifestyle.   Coupon available at